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External Trichotillomania Research

Research projects can help to shed more light on the disorder and treatment possibilities. Hair pulling behaviour and its relationship to Mindfulness and Experiential avoidance. * Relationship between caffeine, trichotillomania and family relationships by Cassandra Curtis of Alliant International University. If you are interested in carrying out a research project and would like any help …

hair pulling and skin picking – a root analysis

With special thanks to Jeannette Johnson for her kind advice and attention. Hair roots contain sebum. Sebum contains fatty acids and tryglycerides, and plays a role in some crucial body functions, such as hydration, inflammation, antioxidants, antimicrobial lipids, and pheromones. Sebum levels increase during puberty and excessive levels of sebum are often associated with skin …

Body Image and Body Dysmorphia as a BFRB Symptom

Do people often say you’re too hard on yourself, or do you see yourself as UNsuccessful or UNattractive? You will find understanding and acceptance here.  Some of us are overly focused on body image and what we feel is not always real. Always choose progress above perfection. This mp3 download made a massive difference to …

Trichotillomania and Genetics

Gene Variation Could Explain Trichotillomania in Some Families After researching 44 families in which one or more family members are trichsters, Duke University Hospital Scientists in Durham, North Carolina have discovered two mutations in a gene called SLITKR1. The other gene worthy of research is the HOXB8 gene. Given the small number of families researched, …

Clinical Research into BFRBs

BFRBs are categorised under Obsessive Compulsive Related Disorders in DSM-5 (The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition). Most BFRBs are sedentary activities, experienced particularly during periods of boredom. Researchers from Stanford University School of Medicine have developed the study of specific nutritional supplements to prevent skin picking and hair pulling. Laboratory mice …

Trichotillomania Research and NAC amino acid

A 2009 study shows an amino acid called NAC (N-acetylcysteine) may be effective at treating trichotillomania. NAC is a form of the amino acid, cysteine and can be found in most health food shops. This powerful antioxidant naturally occurs in many foods and helps the body metabolise omega-3 fatty acids. Natural sources include brussels sprouts, …